Tax Deal Made

Well, they did it. They drug it out to the last minute, but they did it. Weeelll, they did some of it. And I’d really like to thank all of them in Washington for dragging us through this during the holidays and leaving us to sort this all out this morning while at the same time trying to digest all the holiday turkey, food and fun.

Most taxpayers got the extension of the Bush-era tax cuts, a good thing. As you’ll read below, individuals making more than $400,000 single and married couples making more than $450,000 were not so lucky. For those of you in these income levels, we will be talking personally as soon as all the details are ironed out for where we go from here.

Also, the debt ceiling and spending issues have not been addressed, that’s been ‘kicked down the road ‘ a couple months. If we think this over the holidays bickering was nasty and ugly, I fear we ain’t seen nothin yet.

Tax changes included in Congress’ fiscal cliff legislation (01-01-2013)

Here is a summary of the provisions included in the bill, which the President is expected to sign.

Tax rates beginning January 1, 2013:
A top rate of 39.6% (up from 35%) will be imposed on individuals making more than $400,000 a year, $425,000 for head of household, and $450,000 for married filing joint.

2% Social Security reduction gone

AMT permanently patched
A permanent AMT patch, adjusted for inflation, will be made retroactive to 2012.

Dividends and capital gains
The maximum capital gains tax will rise from 15% to 20% for individuals taxed at the 39.6% rates (those making $400,000, $425,000, or $450,000 depending on filing status, as noted above).

Itemized deduction and personal exemption phase-outs
The Pease itemized deduction phase-out is reinstated, and personal exemption phase-out will be reinstated, but with different AGI starting thresholds (adjusted for inflation): $300,000 for married filing joint, $275,000 for head of household, and $250,000 for single.

Estate tax
The estate tax regime will continue to provide an inflation-adjusted $5 million exemption (effectively $10 million for married couples) but will be applied at a higher 40% rate (up from 35% in 2012).

Personal tax credits
The $1,000 Child Tax Credit, the enhanced Earned Income Tax Credit, and the enhanced American Opportunity Tax Credit will all be extended through 2017.

Other personal deductions and exclusions
The following deductions and exclusions are extended through 2013:

  • Discharge of qualified principal residence exclusion;
  • $250 above-the-line teacher deduction;
  • Mortgage insurance premiums treated as residence interest;
  • Deduction for state and local taxes;
  • Above-the-line deduction for tuition; and
  • IRA-to-charity exclusion (plus special provisions allowing transfers made in January 2013 to be treated as made in 2012).
Business provisions
  • The Research Credit and the production tax credits, among others, will be extended through 2013;
  • 15-year depreciation and §179 expensing allowed on qualified real property through 2013;
  • Work Opportunity Credit extended through 2013;
  • Bonus depreciation extended through 2013; and
  • The §179 deduction limitation is $500,000 for 2012 and 2013.

Remember, these are only tax changes with regards to the fiscal cliff legislation. As I have stated in prior emails, there are a batch of new taxes that went into effect on January 1st as part of Obama’s 2010 health care reform legislation. To avoid confusion, I will follow up this email with a separate one addressing these new taxes.

I will have a bit of work sifting through all this in the next few days and as details emerge There are sure to be things that were slipped in to this bill that will need to be looked at. For example, there is apparently a $59 million break to algae growers to encourage biofuel production and I will need to see who of you this may affect…

Please email any questions you may have on any of this and how it may affect your situation. For now, gotta hit the books.

Take care,

Bob

Robert W. Craig, E.A. Tax and Business Services (805) 264-3305

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